Pool and Spa Safety

 
ESFI.org has great tips on staying safe this summer in and around pools and spas.
 
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that since 1990, there have been 60 electrocutions and nearly 50 serious electrical shocks involving electrical hazards in and around swimming pools.
 
Pool and Spa Safety Tips
 
* All outdoor receptacles should be covered to keep them dry. This is especially important around pools, spas and other summer water activities.
* Use a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) for electrical devices used outside to help prevent electrocutions and electric shock injuries.
* Make sure all electrical equipment used for swimming pools (even the cleaning equipment) is grounded.
* Electrical devices and cords should be kept at least 10 feet away from water sources such as pools and spas.
* Never handle electrical devices when you are wet – either from water activities or from perspiration.
* Make sure there are no power lines over a swimming pool.
* Do not swim during a thunderstorm.
* To avoid electric shock drowning, have an electrician inspect and upgrade your pool, spa or hot tub in accordance with applicable local codes and the National Electrical Code® (NEC).
 
 

 
 

ESFI Designates May Electrical Safety Month

May is National Electrical Safety Month, which means it’s time to check your year-round electrical safety awareness efforts, according to the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI).
 
It is estimated that electricity causes 140,000 fires each year. Aging electrical systems, combined with the growing power demands, contribute to electrical fire hazards. Overloaded circuits, flickering lights, and discolored electrical outlets and light switche point to the need for electrical upgrades. Addressing these hazards can save lives, reduce injuries and cut economic losses caused by electrical fires. This is where the electrical contractor comes in.
 
“Despite the fact that improved product safety engineering, standards and electrical codes have reduced electrical hazards, thousands suffer from electrical shock and fires each year,” said Brett Brenner, ESFI president.
 
Each year, electricity kills nearly 400 people and injures thousands more. Increasing awareness of electrical safety could help avoid most of these deaths and injuries. Power line contact with construction equipment, ladders and gardening tools are among the leading causes of electrocutions. Use of ground-fault circuit interrupters to protect against lethal electrical currents also can reduce electrocutions.
 
Take time this month to re-evaluate your safety practices and help others raise their awareness.
 
 
 

Lighting Strike and Testing of Electrical Wiring

Many people ask; “after a lightning strike how can I properly test my electrical wiring?” or “my home was hit by lightning, what should i do?”
 
After lightning strikes, we highly recommend having CurrentSAFE® electrical hazard detection test performed on your home. This test locates any electrical hazards concealed behind your walls; during the CurrentSAFE® process our technician will inspect the wiring inside the walls using minimally invasive tools.
 
North Carolina ranked on the Top Ten States for Number of Lightning Claims by State Farm in 2014*. Lightning may not seem as destructive as other disasters, yet a strike can cause serious damage to electrical equipment and appliances, disrupt electrical service for long periods of time, and spark fires. In 2014, State Farm paid nearly $149 million dollars for insurance claims as a result of damage from lightning strikes.
 
 

Do You Have A Zinsco Panel?

 
Zinsco Panel Boxes May Produce Dangerous Situations ….
 
At one time, Zinsco panels were extremely popular and installed in many homes throughout North America but many are obsolete today! Electricians and home inspectors discovered that certain Zinsco panels often can fail to operate properly as much as 25% of the time and can be a fire or shock risk to homeowners.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zinsco Panel Boxes and Report Flaws
* Zinsco panel may not pass updated safety codes. Leading experts on panel safety says that older Zinsco panels would not receive today’s UL listing. These panel can’t be sold to general public because they don’t meet current safety codes. Safety standards that were once acceptable years ago are no longer considered safe.
* Zinsco panels may have been created with significant design flaws. Zinsco panels reportedly have defects not shared by others. Often times breakers have loose connection making them useless.
* Zinsco Electric panels may have manufacturing defects. Experts noted design flaws in older panels that may not share with other panels. For example, some components are aluminum; the connection between the breakers and bus bar may not be solid; and breakers can appear to be off, yet the panel still allows power to flow.
 
 

Zinsco panels may contain hidden damage that cannot be easily seen. Only professional electricians should explore the panel due to the risks of electric shock. Please give ARC Electric Company and we would be glad to assist – 704-821-7005!