Category Archives: Fire Prevention

Fast Fire Facts (pt. 2) – Fire Prevention Week 2016

fire-prevention-week-2016-arc-electric-company-of-indian-trail
With Fire Prevention Week 2016 wrapping up I thought I would share part 2 of some fast fire fact’s that NFPA shared.
 
Escape planning
* According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
* Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
*One-third of survey respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

 
Heating
* The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean. This usually involved creosote build-up in chimneys.
* Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (33%) of home heating fires and four out of five (81%) home heating deaths.
* Just over half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
* In most years, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries

 

Fast Fire Facts (pt. 1) – Fire Prevention Week 2016

fire-prevention-week-2016-arc-electric-company-of-indian-trail
Leading up to Fire Prevention Week 2016 next week I thought I would share some fast fire fact’s that NFPA shared.
 
Home fires
* Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Only one in five home fires were reported during these hours.
* One quarter of home fire deaths were caused by fires that started in the bedroom. Another quarter resulted from fires in the living room, family room or den.
* Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
* In 2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 367,500 home structure fires. These fires caused 2,745 deaths, 11,825 civilian injuries, and $6.8 billion in direct damage.
* On average, seven people die in U.S. home fires per day.
* Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home fire injuries, followed by heating equipment.
* Smoking materials are the leading cause of home fire deaths.
* Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2014, 15 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 88 deaths.
* During 2009-2013, roughly one of every 335 households had a reported home fire per year.

 
Smoke alarms
* Three out of five home fire deaths in 2009-2013 were caused by fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
* Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
* In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 94% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated 80% of the time.
* When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
* An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires.
 
 
NFPA.org

Fire Prevention Week 2016

fire-prevention-week-2016-arc-electric-company-of-indian-trail

This year the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association – NFPA.org) has released its Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Don’t Wait – Check the Date! Replace Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years.” Fire Prevention Week occurs October 9th – October 15th. This campaign represents the final year of their three-year effort to educate the public about basic but essential elements of smoke alarm safety.
 
Why focus on smoke alarms three years in a row? Because data shows that the public has many misconceptions about smoke alarms, which may put them at increased risk in the event of a home fire. For example, only a small percentage of people know how old their smoke alarms are, or how often they need to be replaced.
 
As a result of those and related findings, they’re addressing smoke alarm replacement this year with a focus on these key messages:
* Smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years.
* Make sure you know how old all the smoke alarms are in your home.
* To find out how old a smoke alarm is, look at the date of manufacture on the back of the alarm; the alarm should be replaced 10 years from that date.
 

“Hear The Beep Where You Sleep”

 
“Hear The Beep Where You Sleep” is this years Fire Prevention Week theme. Working smoke alarms, as well as testing your smoke alarms, is very important. Visit www.FirePreventionWeek.org for more information.
 
Hear the BEEP where you SLEEP

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Fire Prevention Week 2015

Smoke Alarm Safety
Fire Prevention Week is October 4-10 this year and the theme is “hear the BEEP where you SLEEP”. Educating homeowners that every bedroom needs a working smoke detector.
 
Home fires
*Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep.
*One quarter of home fire deaths were caused by fires that started in the bedroom.
*Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
 
Smoke Alarms
*Three out of five home fire deaths in 2007-2011 were caused by fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
*Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
*When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
 
Escape Planning
*According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
*Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
 
 
 

Fire Prevention – Smoke Alarms

Most fire deaths are preventable. Protect yourself and your family by:
Purchase one or more smoke alarms.
Install your alarms properly.
Identify escape routes and practice escaping.
Maintain your alarms.

 

How many should I have in my house?
There should be a least one smoke alarm on every level of your household. Additional alarms will significantly increase your chances of survival
 
Where should I install my smoke alarms?
Follow the manufacturer’s guidance on the recommended location of smoke alarms in a house. Most smoke alarms should be placed on the ceiling or high on a wall near the bedrooms. This enables the alarm to sense the smoke as it approaches the sleeping area. Install your smoke alarm away from air outlet vents to prevent dust accumulation.
 
Know How to Escape
Your smoke alarm will awaken you, but you may not be thinking clearly. You should practice escaping before an emergency strikes. Once a fire has started, it spreads rapidly. You may have only seconds to get out. Normal exits from bedrooms may be blocked by smoke or fire. It is important everyone knows exactly what to do.
 
Identify Escape Routes
Plan two exits from every room. Second story windows may need a rope or chain ladder to enable occupants to escape safely. Choose a meeting place outside the home so you’ll know everyone has escaped. Practice your escape!
 
Maintenance is Important
Your smoke alarm must be maintained properly to provide you and your family with protection.
 
How do I maintain my smoke alarms?
Replace batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Remember to change batteries when you change your clocks!
Dust the grill of your alarm.
Test your alarm monthly or according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

 
Smoke Alarm Program
CFD partners with many community organizations to provide and install Smoke Alarms to residents upon request. To find out more about this program call the smoke alarm hotline at 704-336-2697, complete the Smoke Alarm Request Form or email firesafety@charlottenc.gov
 
 
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/fire/divisions/fireandlifesafety/pages/smoke%20alarms.aspx

Fire Prevention Month….

 
Everything we observe or celebrate has a back story, a tall tale or a legend. When looking into Fire Prevention Month I found a few legends, few tall tales and many eye opening accounts of what actually happened that night and why we want to make sure everyone is aware of fire safety and prevention. When I think of a fire – I instantly think of my lovely outdoor firepit (that as I type this may be a bit too close to my house). I don’t automatically think of a house fire destroying homes and lives. But maybe it should. Fire is dangerous and we should teach our kids and families about it, as to keep them aware, help them know what to do in a scary situation and how to prevent it.
 
Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.
 
According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow – belonging to Mrs. Catherine O’Leary – kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you’ve heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O’Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.
 
Of course, like any good story, the ‘case of the cow’ has some truth to it. The great fire almost certainly started near the barn where Mrs. O’Leary kept her five milking cows. But there is no proof that O’Leary was in the barn when the fire broke out – or that a pyromaniac cow sparked the blaze. Mrs. O’Leary herself swore that she’d been in bed early that night, and that the cows were also tucked in for the evening, as well. But if a cow wasn’t to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day – in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago. But, who really knows?
 
While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn’t the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended. Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area ‘like a tornado,’ some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.
 
Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they’d been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention. The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years. And in 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.
 
Since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. And is celebrated by National Fire Protection Agency and many more the entire month of October!

*nfpa.org