Fast Fire Facts (pt. 1) – Fire Prevention Week 2016

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Leading up to Fire Prevention Week 2016 next week I thought I would share some fast fire fact’s that NFPA shared.
 
Home fires
* Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Only one in five home fires were reported during these hours.
* One quarter of home fire deaths were caused by fires that started in the bedroom. Another quarter resulted from fires in the living room, family room or den.
* Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
* In 2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 367,500 home structure fires. These fires caused 2,745 deaths, 11,825 civilian injuries, and $6.8 billion in direct damage.
* On average, seven people die in U.S. home fires per day.
* Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home fire injuries, followed by heating equipment.
* Smoking materials are the leading cause of home fire deaths.
* Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2014, 15 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 88 deaths.
* During 2009-2013, roughly one of every 335 households had a reported home fire per year.

 
Smoke alarms
* Three out of five home fire deaths in 2009-2013 were caused by fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
* Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
* In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 94% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated 80% of the time.
* When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
* An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires.
 
 
NFPA.org