Smoke Alarm and Carbon Monoxide Detector

Smoke Alarm and CO Detector Public Service Announcement

Smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors can help save lives, but the sad reality is there are still thousands of homes without them. The NFPA reported that between 2009 – 2013, smoke alarms sounded in roughly 53% of the home fires reported to U.S. fire departments. And despite the fact that CO alarms are simple to install and can provide an early warning of the dangerous presence of carbon monoxide, an estimated 70% of U.S. homes are not protected by a working CO alarm according to the ESFI.


Smoke Alarm & Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips to Keep in Mind

 
Smoke Alarm Installation Tips:
* Make sure that everyone in your family knows the difference between the sound of the CO and smoke alarms.
* Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home.
* For the best protection, smoke alarms should be interconnected, so that they all sound if one sounds.
* Hardwired smoke alarms with battery backups are considered to be more reliable than those operated solely by batteries.
* Choose alarms that bear the label of a nationally-recognized testing laboratory.
* Install smoke alarms at least 10 feet from cooking appliances to reduce the possibility of nuisance alarms.

 
Smoke Alarm Maintenance Tips:
* Smoke alarms should be tested once a month by pressing the TEST button.
* Smoke alarm batteries should be replaced at least once a year.
* If an alarm “chirps” or “beeps” to indicate low batteries, they should be replaced immediately.
* Occasionally dust or lightly vacuum the exterior of the alarm to remove dust and cobwebs.
* Smoke alarms should be replaced in at least every ten years.
* Never paint over a smoke alarm.

 
 
Carbon Monoxide Detector Installation Tips:
* Make sure that everyone in your family knows the difference between the sound of the CO and smoke alarms.
* Install CO detectors on every level of your home and outside each sleeping area.
* Interconnected CO detectors provide the best protection. When one sounds, they all sound.
* CO detectors are not a substitute for smoke alarms. Install both types of alarms in your home.

 
Carbon Monoxide Detector Maintenance Tips:
* Test CO detectors at least once a month by pressing the TEST button.
* CO detectors batteries should be replaced at least once a year.
* If an alarm “chirps” or “beeps” to indicate low batteries, they should be replaced immediately.
* CO detectors should be replaced every 7 years.

 
Never ignore a sounding Carbon Monoxide (CO) detector. If your alarm sounds, immediately move to fresh air outside. Alert others In the home to the danger and make sure everyone gets to fresh air safely. Please make sure that everyone in your family knows the difference between the sound of the Carbon Monoxide (CO) detector and a smoke alarm!
 
 
The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) works very hard to promote electrical safety across North America in hopes of saving lives and educating families. And The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) devotes their attention to eliminating deaths, injuries, property loss due to fire and electrical hazards. Both organizations are non-profits and release such great information that we try to pass along to our customers.
 
 
 

ESFI.org & NFPA.org